Guide for New Amputees

Learn the basics of prosthetics
Learn the basics of prosthetics

6 Steps to Your First Steps!

1. Heal: A residual limb that has not completely healed is not only at risk for tearing the surgery site, it is also at risk for infection (6-12 weeks).

2. Shrink: Initial swelling needs to reduce in order to have a proper fitting socket. A shrinker sock is used to aid in the shrinking process (3-5 weeks).

3. Evaluate & Mold: This step is where the prosthesis starts to take shape. You will meet with your prosthetist to get a mold of the residual limb to make your prosthesis. Your prosthetist then works with you and your insurance company to determine what goals you have and how to incorporate them into your new limb. Those goals guide your prosthetist in a direction to get you back to being you.

4. Diagnostic Fitting: This is where you will take your first step! Your first fitting of your new prosthesis is used to determine if any changes need to be made to the socket before the definitive prosthesis is made. This socket is made with a transparent plastic that allows your prosthetist to further customize your socket to ensure a maximum level of comfort (1 week after molding).

5. Definitive Fitting: From the mold of your diagnostic fitting, the “final product” of your prosthesis is made of carbon fiber or other ultra lightweight composite materials. Once you are comfortable in your new limb, you begin your journey!

6. Follow Ups: We will see you weekly for 3 to 4 weeks after the definitive fitting to make sure any changes in your limb don’t affect the fit of your new prosthesis.

*All times assume no complications

Glossary

AK – Above knee or transfemeral amputation.

BK – Below knee or transtibial amputation.

Functional Level – Your ability or potential to ambulate and navigate your environment, on a 0-4 scale.

Gait – Your style of walking.

Prosthetist – Medical professional that designs, fabricates, and fits a prosthesis.

Residual Limb – Remaining part of the amputated arm or leg.

Suspension – The way the prosthesis attaches to the liner, with a vacuum, pin, etc.

Learn the basics of prosethetics

Anatomy of a Prosthesis

Prosthetic knee

 

Liner
Liner – Allows socket to stay secure to the residual limb as well as provides padding. Can be attached to the prosthesis several different ways.
Prosthetic knee
Prosthetic Knee – Aids in providing swing and stance functions like an anatomical knee. Available in both mechanical and micropressor as well as robotically assisted designs.
Shrinker sock
Shrinker Sock – Provides compression to prevent fluid retention and promote healing in residual limb.

 

Interested in learning more about our prosthetics?
Download Prosthetics 101!


Have a question about prosthetics or orthotics? Want more information from one of our certified clinicians? Contact us!

5220 West 12th St.
Little Rock, AR 72204

501-683-8889

1-800-331-2908

webinfo@hortonsoandp.com

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When Will My Prosthetic Be Ready?

Remember – your prosthetic will be ready about two weeks AFTER your insurance approves your claim. We can’t begin production until your insurance has approved your prosthetic. We know how frustrating the wait can be, and we do everything in our power to make sure that your prosthetic gets to you as soon as humanly possible. Thank you for your understanding and patience.

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