Pediatrics

pediatric prosthetics

Creating pediatric orthotic and prosthetic devices for children is very different than creating the same devices for an adult experiencing a similar condition. The orthotists and prosthetists at Horton’s Orthotics & Prosthetics are educated and experienced in dealing with these challenges to help your child grow and succeed. Through collaboration with your child’s pediatrician and physical or occupational therapists, we learn and evaluate your child’s specific needs to discover solutions that will improve their daily lives.

Children are often times much more adaptable to prosthetics than adults. That is why infants born with a missing or partial limb, or children who lose a limb through injury or amputation, should be evaluated by a prosthetist as soon as possible to begin treatment. Starting early will also help give your child time to adjust to and understand their prosthetic, making social interactions with their peers at school and in extracurricular activities much easier.

Our specialties and products allow us to care for children from infancy through adulthood with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, scoliosis, foot drop, plagiocephaly, plantar fasciitismultiple sclerosis, amputations, and many other diagnoses. We also provide preventative sports orthotics for protection during athletic activities and activity-specific prosthetic devices for swimming, basketball, fishing, etc. Each device we produce is custom-designed to help your child stay active and enjoy their daily activities for years to come.

Pediatric Conditions We Treat

pediatric scoliosis brace

Scoliosis

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is an abnormal curvature of the spine that occurs during adolescent growing periods, usually between the ages of 10 and 18. We provide custom spinal orthoses, or back braces, that work to impede the spine from continuing to curve.

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pediatric AFO

Foot Drop

Foot drop is characterized by weakness in the ankle and toe usually experienced by children with cerebral palsy (CP),Multiple Sclerosis (MS), or spinal cord injuries. Device option include ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) which add stability and aid a child in making the movements necessary for walking.

Frequently Asked Questions About Pediatric Orthotic and Prosthetic Devices

Depending on your child’s diagnosis and specific needs, the answer could be yes or no. Contact your child’s pediatrician for more information about their condition and what you can expect.

Your child’s custom-fitted device has some allowance for growth built into it for toe and foot growth. If you start to notice redness, blisters, or indentations on the top or sides of their feet, this means that they have outgrown it. Once their brace no longer allows for growth, it will be time for a new one.


Have a question about prosthetics or orthotics? Want more information from one of our certified clinicians? Contact us!

5220 West 12th St.
Little Rock, AR 72204

501-683-8889

1-800-331-2908

webinfo@hortonsoandp.com

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When Will My Prosthetic Be Ready?

Remember – your prosthetic will be ready about two weeks AFTER your insurance approves your claim. We can’t begin production until your insurance has approved your prosthetic. We know how frustrating the wait can be, and we do everything in our power to make sure that your prosthetic gets to you as soon as humanly possible. Thank you for your understanding and patience.

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